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hardypotter

Guest
I`ve try but don`t know...... it don`t work....

I haven`t recive any mail....don`t know what`s happend ....

One point is for sure, i have no acces to my computer till 14.10.2008 :((​
if they changed your mail, an email would have been sent to your account. check under spam in case tribal wars admin's email address was classified there by your email provider
 

hardypotter

Guest
well then maybe your email address was not changed. Try requesting a lost password link tw provides
 

jack da wakka

Guest
I highly recommend AVG if you get it get the latest version 8.0 it does the scans automatically and it does not come up even with a window its great and every month it scans every website listed on Google so when you go on google it tells you if the site is safe or not just by putting thr mouse over the link for the website it is a exelent prouduct get it and you will be safe forever.
 

michealPW

Guest
problem with linux is that you can change the coding of the system,
Excuse me, but this is simply untrue.

There's a reason GNU/Linux systems have the specific filesystem layouts they do. System binaries ("Coding of the system") are stored in a location that's not writable by users.

In other words, no.. You cannot change the "coding of the system"

if you get i virus that effects linux its actually even worse than a windows or mac machine.
How could a virus be worse for GNU/Linux, Windows or Mac or any other system for that matter? A virus either performs it's actions or fails while trying...

thats why linux never became a widely used OS.
This is so wrong!

Linux is actually very widely used in Servers, Clusters ( http://www.beowulf.org/, ) Embedded Devices ( http://www.linuxdevices.com/, ) and after the publicity of being used in the special effects production of the movie The Titanic ( http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/2494, ) GNU/Linux is very widely used in Hollywood:)

Perhaps the most interesting uses of GNU/Linux, in my opinion, are the all-in-one Anti-Virus, Firewall and Spam Filter devices running GNU/Linux that claim to be able to protect your entire home network of Windows computers!!
 
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Sir.Robin.

Guest
Excuse me, but this is simply untrue.

There's a reason GNU/Linux systems have the specific filesystem layouts they do. System binaries ("Coding of the system") are stored in a location that's not writable by users.

In other words, no.. You cannot change the "coding of the system"
Being able to make alterations to the linux kernel is an advantage either way...
 

michealPW

Guest
Being able to make alterations to the linux kernel is an advantage either way...
You don't understand..

Take for example the most popular Desktop Linux system right now, Ubuntu...

On Ubuntu, the kernel image is stored in /boot, which is not writable by anyone other than root.

When you operate the system, --for example while you're playing Tribal Wars-- you're not logged into Ubuntu as root. In fact, you cannot log into a graphical environment under Ubuntu as root at all and you cannot log into the system remotely (Over the internet) as root, either.

In this way, if you ever happened to get a "virus", it wont be allowed to perform any of the actions it was meant to perform.
 

servy

Guest
In this way, if you ever happened to get a "virus", it wont be allowed to perform any of the actions it was meant to perform.
Yes and no. While you may not be logged in as root if you have poor security (or if the attacker is better than your good security) there are ways for them to gain access to root.
 

michealPW

Guest
if you have poor security
The security of UNIX-like systems are because of their simple, logical designs... That's the whole point, actually. KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid.)

there are ways for them to gain access to root.
I'm not familiar with any, besides obvious Social Engineering techniques^^

What techniques would you be referring to?
 

Sir.Robin.

Guest
You don't understand..

Take for example the most popular Desktop Linux system right now, Ubuntu...

On Ubuntu, the kernel image is stored in /boot, which is not writable by anyone other than root.

When you operate the system, --for example while you're playing Tribal Wars-- you're not logged into Ubuntu as root. In fact, you cannot log into a graphical environment under Ubuntu as root at all and you cannot log into the system remotely (Over the internet) as root, either.

In this way, if you ever happened to get a "virus", it wont be allowed to perform any of the actions it was meant to perform.

I'm well aware of that, in your initial post you didn't mention you couldn't do those things while not signed in as root, you just stated you couldn't do them. I'm a large linux fan (specifically CentOS) and generally stick to the terminal over Gnome or KDE.
 

servy

Guest
The security of UNIX-like systems are because of their simple, logical designs... That's the whole point, actually. KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid.)



I'm not familiar with any, besides obvious Social Engineering techniques^^

What techniques would you be referring to?
I saw one in a powerpoint in a class a few weeks ago, but I don't remember it off of the top of my head.

I just went and looked it up. It involved injecting some code into a situation in which a program required the use of commands of the root account, and at that time injected
Code:
‘|shell(“cmd /c echo “ & char(124) & “format c:”)|’
to be run by the database.
 

michealPW

Guest
Code:
‘|shell(“cmd /c echo “ & char(124) & “format c:”)|’
to be run by the database.
Ja, this would be a severe problem with that DBMS, not UNIX.... It also would require very specific and dangerous settings to be applied to the machine before any success was to be had^^

To mitigate your fear, no modern GNU/Linux system will install software like that. That's something the administrator setup for your class to demonstrate the dangers of the setuid bit. In UNIX, in order to get a Daemon (In the NT world, "Services",) to run as root, their binary file must have the setuid bit set to the root user. This, to begin, requires you to be root in order to modify that binary, as it would be write-protected. Also, this assumes the binary is there in the first place, as there's no reason you'd need a DBMS installed on your Desktop Linux system, such as Ubuntu. In addition, LOL, you'd also need the system setup to allow those remote instructions to reach the DBMS in the first place. Again, out of the box, Ubuntu would not allow this:)

The DBMS would need to be modified to run as root, configured to accept arbitrary instructions from arbitrary locations and the Netfilter system would need some changes, too as most GNU/Linux systems default to dropping all incomming packets not associated with a previously sent outbound packet (In lay-mens terms, unless you initiated the communication, it gets silently dropped.) then, yes, you'd have a serious potential for privilege elevation:)

P.s: based on the commands being executed, that seems like a Windows NT-based server, not UNIX:)
 

servy

Guest
Ja, this would be a severe problem with that DBMS, not UNIX.... It also would require very specific and dangerous settings to be applied to the machine before any success was to be had^^

To mitigate your fear, no modern GNU/Linux system will install software like that. That's something the administrator setup for your class to demonstrate the dangers of the setuid bit. In UNIX, in order to get a Daemon (In the NT world, "Services",) to run as root, their binary file must have the setuid bit set to the root user. This, to begin, requires you to be root in order to modify that binary, as it would be write-protected. Also, this assumes the binary is there in the first place, as there's no reason you'd need a DBMS installed on your Desktop Linux system, such as Ubuntu. In addition, LOL, you'd also need the system setup to allow those remote instructions to reach the DBMS in the first place. Again, out of the box, Ubuntu would not allow this:)

The DBMS would need to be modified to run as root, configured to accept arbitrary instructions from arbitrary locations and the Netfilter system would need some changes, too as most GNU/Linux systems default to dropping all incomming packets not associated with a previously sent outbound packet (In lay-mens terms, unless you initiated the communication, it gets silently dropped.) then, yes, you'd have a serious potential for privilege elevation:)

P.s: based on the commands being executed, that seems like a Windows NT-based server, not UNIX:)
Well, as I said, it was on a powerpoint in a class; the scope was more of a, "This is the kind of thing that can happen if you don't do your job right" and as such a full context wasn't given. That said, the professor does know what he's talking about and I feel pretty confident that if it made it into that slide it's probably been done to someone at some point.
 

warandchaos

Still Going Strong
Article has been re-written, if anything is incorrect please tell me.
Also, if the links dont work anymore, let me know about that too.
 

bloodhawk91

Guest
Windows security essentials is a nice Anti-virus program aswell

Its user friendly, free, and takes up a very low amount of resources.

Made by microsoft ofcourse, so it only works on windows, but all in all a very good free software which is as good as and even better than most antivirus programs you have to pay for today.